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This is England British Social Realism, Genre & Narrative

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This is England Character Analysis

This is an in depth analysis of each character in John Meadow’s ‘This is England’. I gave a description on their physical appearance, behaviour and mannerisms, quotes, relationships and how these things establish significance and conflict within the narrative.

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This is England montage

 

The reggie song ’54-46 was my number’ was played during the opening montage of This is England. This is significant because it articulates that the British loved and adopted the music and pop culture of other ethnicities including Jamaican reggie which has black heritage. However, they saw these people as outsiders and continued to hate and fear them.
54-46 Was My Number
Stick it up, mister!
Hear what I say sir, yeah yeah
Get your hands in the air, sir!
Then you will get no hurt, mister, no no no
I said yeah (I said yeah)
What they say (listen what they say)
Don’t you hear? I say, yeah (yeah yeah)
Listen what they say (listen what they say)
Do you believe I would take such a thing with me
And give it to a police man?
I wouldn’t do that (ooh, ooh)
And if I do that, I would say “Sir
Come on and put the charge on me”
I wouldn’t do that, no (ooh, ooh)
I wouldn’t do that (ooh, ooh)
I’m not a fool to hurt myself
So I was innocent of what they done to me
They was wrong
They were wrong (ooh, ooh)
Give it to me one time (huh)
Give it to me two times (huh-huh)
Give it to me three times (huh-huh-huh)
Give it to me four times (huh-huh-huh-huh)
54-46 was my number
Right now, someone else has that number
54-46 was my number, was my number
Right now, someone else has that number
I said yeah (I said yeah)
Listen what they say (listen what they say)
Oh I say hear me now (yeah yeah)
Listen what they say (listen what they say)
Give it to me one time (huh)
Give it to me two times (huh-huh)
Gimme, gimme, gimme, gimme, gimme, gimme
Gimme, gimme, gimme, gimme
No, no, no, no
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Lighting for Meaning

https://www.wevideo.com/view/2469499317

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Advanced Cinematography

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Movement for Meaning

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Framing for Meaning

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Narrative

Narrative Analysis of Pan’s Labyrinth

       Narrative Analysis of Pan’s Labyrinth

 This narrative analysis of Pan’s Labyrinth explains the narrative structure, characters and overall themes that are present in Del Toro’s ‘Pan’s Labyrinth’.

 The most predominant theme throughout the film was disobedience. This is consistently explored through the character of Ofelia , as well as certain conflicts within the film such as the rebels who are fighting Captain Vidal.

How narrative study is useful in understanding this film

 – Disobedience is a predominant theme throughout Pan’s Labyrinth. This is shown through the protagonist Ofelia, who disobeys many of the instructions she is given throughout the film, including when she eats the grape in the pale man’s lair. However this rebelliousness was articulated from the start when she refused her mothers instructions to call captain Vidal her ‘father’.

– Pan’s Labyrinth has a split narrative between the real world and the fantasy world.

– The film is mostly set in a forest or ‘underworld’ communicates that this film is fantasy genre. Pan’s Labyrinth also has implications of actual fairy tales and in some cases biblical references.

– The mystical creatures that help Ofelia on her journey such as the faun are considered the donor in Vladimir Propp’s character theory. This is because he gives her the equipment and guidance that she needs in order to complete her quest.

– Captain Vidal is perceived  as the monster in the real world but it is suggested that he is represented as the Pale Man in the fantasy world. Without narrative study it would be near  impossible to find the link between them.

– Ofelias journey begins when the faun is introduced.This meeting is what starts the two major plots in the film.

 

 

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Contexts

Pan’s Labyrinth Context Research.

      Narrative Analysis of Pan’s Labyrinth

                        Context is:

  • The environment in which the film is set
  • The environment in which the film was produced
  • The environment in which the film is seen

The context may be social, political, historical, philosophical or a combination of more than one of these. These contexts are extremely important in order to fully understand a film, since they give the viewers background knowledge on what is happening or going to happen in the film based on what they already know historically.

Context in Pan’s Labyrinth:

Philosophical Context: In the Pale man scene there are links to biblical tales.This is apparent when Ofelia must retrieve a dagger from the lair of the Pale man, a child-eating monster who sits at the head of a large feast. In order to accomplish this task Ofelia must obtain the dagger and not eat anything. However, she ignores the fan’s instructions and gives into temptation when she eats some grapes. As a result the pale man hunts her and attempts to kill her.This is a reference to when Adam and Eve also didn’t follow orders and gave into temptations when they ate an apple. This caused them to be cast out of the Garden Of Eden.

Historical Context: Pan’s labyrinth is set in Spain in 1944, five years after the end of the Spanish Civil War. In the real world side of this movie, the post war effects on Spain are shown in depth through the fight between the fascists and the rebbels. 

 

 

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Representation

Representing Ophelia

The moment in my narrative was the representation when Ofelia meets the faun.

Feedback: Use more examples of how the Mise En Scene and lighting.